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Apr 25, 2010

stopping for pee-pee

I was listening to the radio a short while ago while driving and the radio host had a guest talkign about the upcoming traffic expected to Meron for Lag B'Omer.

The guest, some expert on road safety, was talking about how to be safe, rest before driving home, drive carefully, no alcohol, etc. with some very specific suggestions. It was a very interesting discussion, and what he stressed most of all was that there are going to be buses from all over all night long and there really is no reason to drive - it is just trouble and dangerous. Take the bus if at all possible.

I went up a few years ago ion Lag B'Omer night and I support what he said - take the bus if at all possible. You will be tired, it will be a hassle, it will be dangerous,, and you will save yourself a lot of hassle and trouble and danger by taking the bus.

But what I really want to point out was a funny aspect of the discussion. he repeated a few times, when discussing how to drive up safely for people who insist on driving their own cars - he kept mentioning not stopping on the side of the road for "pee pee", and not waiting until the last minute for kids who need "pee-pee" and then stopping in dangerous spots. Plan in advance where you will have a rest and "pee-pee" stop and stop there.

I thought that was funny. It felt like an "Only in Israel" would they discuss how to properly stop on the side of the road for "pee-pee". It is kind of gross, but is so common that it is just one of those things...

6 comments:

  1. Yes, grown women will regularly mention "Yesh li pipi" as they would "Nice dress" or "Bad rain we're having".

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  2. Thank G-d not in my circles. But it is rather shocking how the men who stop at the side of the road don't even try to hide behind the car or anything - it's just as normal for them as adults as it was in gan....

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  3. rafi obviously hasnt given birth in an israeli hospital b/c the drs and nurses constantly ask you 'asit kaki?' 'asit pipi?'

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  4. The words used can seem a bit strange because they are childish terms.

    But, frankly, to me as a non-American this post seems to reflect the American tendency to avoid anything vaguely like an explicit reference to things toilet-related.

    ReplyDelete
  5. A friend of mine told me he was on a cross-country bus tour and everytime they stopped, the driver would call out, "OK everyone, coffee out, coffee in!"

    ReplyDelete

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