Aug 15, 2013

the problems of a three-day yomtov

This year Rosh Hashana falls out on Thursday and Friday, followed by Shabbos. The classic "three-day yomtov"..

If you are anything like me, the worst thing about 3-day yomtov is the shower situation.. The next worst thing is probably the food preparation - heating, reheating, cooking, leaving fires on, using timers, etc...

It turns out there are other problems as well..

The Rabbanut kashrut division has to deal with the issue of milking cows.. by law, all dairy farms have to have storage vats for the milk that can hold 48 hours worth of milk. That means many dairy farms around Israel will not have enough storage for a holiday that will last 72 hours.

True, rare as it is, this is not the first time we are having a 3-day yomtov in Israel. I do not know what they did last time - maybe they found the same solution as now.

Rav Chaggai Bar-Giyyora of the Rabbanut has instructed dairy farmers that do have vats large enough to store 72 hours worth of milk that they will not be allowed to transport milk during the holiday. Dairy farmers with vats that only hold 48 hours worth of milk will be allowed to transport milk - but only on Friday, the 2nd day of Rosh Hashana (when there is room for leniency on some issues) and only via a non-Jewish driver.

Rav Bar-Giyyora stressed that such milk transported on Rosh Hashana will only be sold bearing the regular kosher label and not as mehadrin kosher. Mehadrin kosher milk will not be transported on Rosh Hashana or shabbos, not even via a non-jewish driver.
(source: INN)

If you eat or drink only mehadrin and were concerned about buying your  milk after Rosh Hashana, you can breathe easy - the mehadrin milk will not be from those batches of milk. I guess it means the dairy farms selling milk as mehadrin all must have the larger tanks for milk storage.

I guess it also means that the companies like Tnuva and Tara, and others, will have to have their milk intake centers open on Rosh Hashana (Friday) for receiving the milk from the farmers. Or else to where are the non-Jewish drivers going to be transporting all that milk?

oy.. the problems of a three-day yomtov.. at least it is relatively rare out here...





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10 comments:

  1. It hasn't been rare at all in recent years. I don't get why everyone makes such a big deal about it. (The one year I was in seminary, sure enough it was a 3-day RH, and the entire Israeli office staff - really just one lady - was totally discombobulated).

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  2. Last time it happened we had a 'country wide' milk shortage. I couldn't find milk before Yom Tov and we had guests coming from other parts of the country who couldn't find milk either.

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    1. Right, I think it was only last year. That was later followed by a shortage yellow cheese. This is the challenge of living in a small country with little storage space .

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  3. Cooking? We have it MUCH easier than in times of old. think about it. We have freezers and refrigerators.

    True, one would want to have fresh things made on Yom Tov and for Shabbath. None the less, much could be made beforehand.

    Too bad you're not Yemenite. Rav Yosef Qapah ztz"l ruled that the geziroth on fire do not apply to an electric plata, thus anything cooked (except water, or course), even liquids may be put on and off the plata directly.

    Problems with showering? Even Rav Noiberg(er?) says one may wash his body, a part at a time.

    Please also tell me how it is assur to jump in a brief cold shower to cool off?

    Halakhah isn't the rocket science that rabbis want us to think it is.

    I love "3 day yom tov." It provides a full three days of not having to deal with the world other than spiritual matters.

    Of course, I don't have to deal with whining kids and soiled diapers. So, maybe that's not fair.

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  4. I second Esser. I love 3DYT. Baruch Hashem that we cannot do internet, email and cellphone . Baruch Hashem for fridges and hotplates. There is virtually no need to make something fresh for most people. One of the best parts of 3DYT, is that we welcome Shabbat totally relaxed. No running around on Friday 'getting ready' and no falling asleep during kabbalat Shabbat.
    Esser, I bless you that by next 3DYT (Rosh Hashana 5775 :-) you will be happily married and handling your whining child with diapers.

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  5. This post has been included in Shiloh Musings: Hot August Havel Havelim.  Please visit and share.
    Shabbat Shalom

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  6. IIRC the last time that we had a three day yom tov the rabbinate wasn't so meikel about allowing a non-jew to transport the milk on yom tov sheni. they wanted farmers to spill out the milk.

    who exactly is going to check that it is a non-jew driving? that he arrives during the permitted time? a rabbi is going to hang out at the t'nuva storage sites for the three days?

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    1. That's exactly what I thought. In all these cases of finding goyim to do the work and then everyone cheering about preventing chillul Shabbat. Whether it's at the electric company, water company, bus companies, taxi services, El Al, Tnuva - it is inevitable that someone Jewish, in 'best' case, might have to fill in once in a while , and in 'worst' case - there will be a Jew in any case supervising a.k.a. working, something at one point of the chain.

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    2. tnuva does have a solution that they use on about 50 kibbutzim for checking chalov yisrael on shabbat. there are digital cameras which record what the non-jewish workers do. on motzei shabbat, the kashrut supervisors come to work and review the data. this is accepted as a mehadrin solution.

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