Sep 25, 2019

kosher poison

I went to the store to buy the Israeli version of "Drano", and the store had 3 different brands..




2 out of the 3 have kosher certification, though 1 of them is only for Pesach and not [necessarily] year-round.
The third one, all the way on the left, had no kashrut certification but was also the most expensive. That might prove that kashrut certification has no effect on the price. Or maybe it just because it is a name-brand product, made by Yakobi.

The middle product actually has kashrut certification from two different kashrut organizations, in case you don't rely on one, you have the other.

Would you buy one of these bottles of poison specifically with kashrus certification?


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6 comments:

  1. Depends. To pour down a floor drain, no need for hashgacha. To pour down a kitchen sink drain, inside which you wash your dishes, yes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Even if it was made from non-kosher material, once it becomes caustic it is no longer non-kosher!

      Delete
  2. why?
    you dont pour it in the sink, you pour it down the drain, let it sit in the pipes and then wash it away. you arent putting it on your food? it is poison!

    ReplyDelete
  3. There may be another issue here in fact. Because I have seen in the past toilet paper with a hechsher. It is not really a hechsher, but approval from Badatz, that the factory does not work on Shabbat. Maybe that is what the stamp says. באישור הבד"ץ

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. the bottle with the eida hechsher says "meushar". the bottle with the two hechshers says "kosher"

      Delete
  4. My car currently has kosher windshield washer fluid under Rabbanut Tzfat. Perhaps they can understand why non-edible products need hashgacha.

    ReplyDelete

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