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Jan 27, 2009

Tzipi Livni's brother opposes her (video)

Tzipi Livni's brother, Eli Livni, is campaigning on behalf of the Likud. He says Tzipi is not worthy of being Prime Minister.

What I find to be amazing is when he says why he is campaigning against her - he says, standing outside of Metzudat Ze'ev - the headquarters of the Likud - that this is his home, where he grew up, lived his whole life, it is part of his life, etc. The Livni family was of the founding families of the Likud, and it was a shock when Tzipi abandoned the Likud for Kadima. So it is no surprise that other members of her family are stil Likudniks.



But I find it amazing because he is opposing her and is willing to say that the Likud and Metzudat Ze'ev are part of him - but his sister is not? Didn't he grow up with her too? Perhaps they were not close, but it seems funny that he talks about the Likud like that but not his own sister.... Not just not talk about his sister like that, but he strongly opposes her.

And who the heck would not want their own sister to be prime minister, even if it is from a different party??? Very strange.

6 comments:

  1. Clearly a case of classic family values.

    But you know i think you are looking at this in the wrong way. I dont think that the Livni family is really the same as the Rafi G. family. They have been in politics for a long time, and here is a case where she has clearly gone far from the values of the family (according to her brother at least). So why would he share in her joy of being PM, if he doesn't agree with her politics and all her political activities?
    We aren't talking about if your brother was running for president, we are talking about someone who clearly disagrees with her politics and doesnt want to see her up there.
    I can actually understand what he is saying.

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  2. I have no problem with him remaining in the Likud even though she is a PM candidate from Kadima. She is the anomaly, not him.
    What is strange is that he spoke up so negatively about her.
    The Likud blood in him runs deeper than the sibling blood....

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  3. But I find it amazing because he is opposing her and is willing to say that the Likud and Metzudat Ze'ev are part of him - but his sister is not?

    He never said that his sister is not.

    Didn't he grow up with her too? Perhaps they were not close, but it seems funny that he talks about the Likud like that but not his own sister....

    He was asked by the reporter about his relationship with the Likud, and what he was doing at Metzudat Ze'ev. So that's what he answered.

    Not just not talk about his sister like that, but he strongly opposes her.

    He opposes her political stance, and the terrible things that she wants to do -- i.e., giving away parts of Eretz Yisrael, and endangering our security.

    If someone is already strongly opposed to those things, but withheld his criticism because the political figure promoting them happened to be his sibling -- then there is a word for that: Hypocrisy.

    You seem to be criticising the man for remaining true to his principles, and not being a hypocrite.

    And who the heck would not want their own sister to be prime minister, even if it is from a different party???

    If my sister were running for PM, and wanted to do the things that Tzippi Livni does, then I certainly would not want to see her become PM.

    What kind of society do you want to live in? One where our political loyalties and choices are determined by family relationships and protektzia, or one where they are determined by one's principles and beliefs? I know what Eli Livni's answer to that question is, and it is mine as well.

    Very strange.

    Only if one regards personal integrity and intellectual honesty as being "strange". Eli Livni is to be commended.

    Tell me, when you saw the Star Wars movies, did you find the story "strange" because Luke Skywalker didn't support his own father?

    Btw, the exact same situation as the one in Tzipi Livni's family prevails in that of Limor Livnat. Her parents both fought in Lehi and Etzel and were lifelong Jabotinskyites -- exactly the same as Livni's parents. Livnat's father, Uzi, fought to bring down Bibi's government in 1998 -- in which Limor served -- because of the Wye Accords. And Livnat's brother, Noam, is a religious settler, and a fiercely dedicated activist who fought against the Expulsion and the government that brought it about -- in which Limor Livnat also served, and in which she supported the Expulsion.

    Here's what Noam Livnat said in an interview, when asked about his sister: "We don't talk about our ideological differences. We don't discuss these issues. We keep the family out of politics. I don't intend to talk about my sister's political views, and she won't talk about my ideology. We don't talk of these things. The family is outside of all this. We only talk about personal things."

    The reporter then asked: "After she voted for the disengagement plan, didn't you want to ask her, 'Sister, what are you doing?'" To which he replied: "We are a brother and sister who love each other very much. I don't talk about any political issues. For me, Limor is a sister, not the education minister."

    There is no reason to assume that Eli Livni does not have the same sort of relationship with his sister. And what is wrong with that?

    What is strange is that he spoke up so negatively about her.

    Really? What, exactly, did he say about her that was negative? I played the clip three times and could not find any such thing. As far as I can tell, he is only talking about the issues -- just as Noam Livnat does.

    Your criticism is very misplaced.

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  4. Lurker - I was not criticizing him, just pointing out what looks like an unusual situation.

    But I do think that that if my brother or sister was a leading candidate (not that I would consider Livni a leading candidate at this point) for the position, I would be excited about that..

    Regardless, it is not in the clip, but I heard him say it when they were talking in an interview on the radio - in his words -"hee lo mateema lehiyot rosh memshala"...

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  5. The real irony is that Eli Livni did leave the Likud for Kadima, only returning after the Second Lebanon War. His holier-than-thou (or "Likudier"-than-thou) position is very funny.

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  6. I don't really enjoy discussing this because it's so sad what Tzippy (and so many of the other second-generation Herutniks) did but I need to speak up because you've chosen to present an Alice in Wonderland perspective as to who should be in the defendant's dock. I'm sure you didn't mean for it to come off quite as it did, but...

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