Jun 8, 2009

The New Koren Sacks Siddur is mine!

I don't buy books often anymore (for myself), but bookstores (all types) have always been of my favorite types of stores. Yesterday I went to a seforim store to buy a bar mitzva present. While there I took advantage and bought myself a copy of the new Koren - Sacks Siddur.


Growing up, the koren tanach was always the baseline for correct text. Everybody had one, and whether or not you actually used it for learning, it was always used to solve disputes as to teh accuracy of text or vowalization or cantillation.
Those of us who grew up reading regularly from the Torah in shul, would always check with the Koren when there was a question.
One more memory of Koren is that when I was younger I thought it strange that it had the same, or very similar, name to that of the Kuran. Lehavdil.

Anyways, I bought it last night and used it this morning for the first time.

The first thing you notice is that the Hebrew text is on the left side, and the translation on the right. At first it seemed strange, but when davening I did not even notice it. It seemed natural.

Also it is linear, and I never used the Artscroll Linear (and Metsuda Linear was too long ago for me), so I cannot really compare it. It is a nice siddur. During the week who has time to look at translation or the commentary at the bottom.... so I'll see later how I like that...

Happy Davening! Based on childhood memories, you cannot go wrong with Koren.

11 comments:

  1. I am waiting for the Hebrew only rendition, which Koren says is in the pipeline.

    ReplyDelete
  2. ofcourse the Hebrew is the reverse of what you thought it would be. The brits always drive on the wrong side of the road!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Actually, it's quite logical.

    I got used to it referencing Mechon Mamre's online Hebrew-English Bible.

    Then again, I haven't used a Hebrew-English siddur in decades.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I also have not used Eng-Heb in a while. I like the all hebrew Art Scroll Israeli Edition. I was hoping Koren would put out something similar to that.. maybe eventually.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Is Shy Guy's first comment a Joke? Koren have had a great Hebrew-only siddur available for at least 20 years.

    I like it because it is thin and easy to fit in a tallis bag (although there is an edition available on thicker paper), however I no longer use it regularly as I find Koren's font difficult to read - even though it was the first font ever designed explicitly for a siddur)

    And BTW - Holly Roller, this is an American Siddur, not British. It was commissioned by the OU.
    The translation comes from the new Singer Siddur (which is an excellent siddur IMHO), however that siddur has the English on the Right.

    ReplyDelete
  6. No, Michael. No joke.

    Koren's existing Hebrew Siddur has nothing in it but the prayer text.

    The new siddur is chock full of well written commentary from Rabbi Sacks.

    I also don't like the old Koren's font. I have been using pocket Rinat Yisraels for over 30 years.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Barnes & Noble has this Siddur, but they only list the Ashkenaz, or Mizrach, but no Nusach Sefard. Do they have a Nusach Sefard version?

    I just love the typeface and layout of my Siddur Yerushalayim and the small Chumash with Shabbos davening (both all Hebrew).

    Anyone know?

    ReplyDelete
  8. There seems to be a bit of confusion with regards to the various editions.

    For Israel, there is (at the moment) nusach Ashkenaz, Sefard and Edot Mizrach. All Hebrew for Israel.

    For America (which also works in Israel) there is the Koren Sacks Siddur, bilingual with intro, commentary and translation by Rav Sacks and halakha guide by Rabbi Clark.

    There is also, very shortly, (ie it's at the printers) the Talpiot Edition. This is the same as the Sacks ie for America, but no Sacks, so no translation, commentary or intro, but with Halakha Guides. This again is for America, but works in Israel.

    Both these editions are nusach Ashkenaz. There will most likely be a nusach Sefard in the Talpiot edition.

    For Israel, there are at least 2 new siddurim in the pipeline. That means we are working on it and should be out in the months ahead. The first is the new Tziyyon edition. Again, this is for Israel only, with instructions in Hebrew. There are some very nice features in this siddur which have yet to be announced. This is not a Sacks Siddur in Hebrew but a new siddur.

    This will be available initially nusach Ashkenaz and Sefard (they will be released together) and later Edot Mizrach.

    There is also another siddur again Ashkenaz and Sefard, being worked on by Rav Rimon (Rav "Yatz"). This should be out in about a year or so.

    Again both Tziyyon and Rimon are Ashkenaz and Sefard for Israel in Hebrew.

    I hope that this clears things up.

    ReplyDelete
  9. thank you for updating us, and keep up the good work!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Thank you so much Rafael Freeman.

    Just one more clarification: What is the Tziyyon siddur?

    Rabbi Sacks is English, (that is the right Rabbi Sacks?) one would think they might have his trans etc in English for those in England (which would also cover Amer)?

    ReplyDelete
  11. I think I mentioned this in my previous post.

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...