Jun 15, 2015

MIAAD: A Fight to Unite (A song for every Jew in Israel and beyond) (video)

nice..

Miiad—A Fight to Unite , a delightful music video to promote Jewish unity, has just been released. It marks the beginning of a worldwide movement for Jewish unity launched by The One Voice Foundation. American-Israeli songwriter, Katia Bolotin, composed the music and lyrics to Miiad with the hope that the song’s unifying message will be taken to heart and actualized. Bolotin believes that “Jewish unity is not just a lofty pursuit, but essential to overcome the challenges of our times. The Torah teaches us that peace and blessing are predicated upon our viewing one another favorably and joining together. Our mission is to look beyond our differences and to find ways to heal the rifts that divide us. We must unite our fragmented people.” Miiad was recorded in Jerusalem and is sung by Israeli singer Bezalel David.

Miiad—A Fight to Unite is more than a feel good song; it is a call for action. It’s meant to be shared and talked about, and to have its message internalized by each and every Jew. “Each of us can have an impact on someone else,” Bolotin says. “the goal is to grow a movement that can, and will, change the way we think and ultimately act. Each of us must become an integral link in the chain. Jewish unity is possible. Join the dance!”

“I’m very happy to have Jewbellish as the launching pad for this fight to unite,” said Mendy Pellin, Co-Founder of Jewbellish.com. “If anyone is crazy enough to pick this fight, it’s us!” 

For further information and to join the “Fight to Unite” visit jewbellish.com or contact unite@jewbellish.com






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3 comments:

  1. "HaAm" "The nation" or "the people" Notice that "HaAm" represented here has a variety of religious figures, and one - only one - fellow who isn't dati. And all the women and children were religious. Is that representative of "HaAm"? Not at all...

    There are also a few 'theological' points I could quibble with - the role of mashiah and meaning of the term 'glut' - but the most fundamental and inarguable failure is the misrepresentation of who "HaAm" is.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That should read 'galut' above. Damned autocorrect....

      Delete
  2. Exactly what do you mean by who the 'HaAm' is? Please clarify.

    ReplyDelete

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