Jan 13, 2014

Proposed Law: no more Nazis in Israel

Almost every hafgana ends having protesters calling members of the security forces "Nazi". Of course it is reprehensible, but it seems to happen over and over again. The protesters do it probably because they think it is a sure way of getting under their skin, with a sharp insult like that. Maybe a few of such protesters even believe it, in some demented way. Otherwise, why would some people hurl such an insult when it seems so obvious that this is a word or expression that should be kept from being abused like this?

Either this might soon come to an end or a lot more people will end up in jail.

Yesterday the Ministerial Legislative Committee approved a proposed law that would make it illegal to call anyone "Nazi". Actually, it would be illegal to make use of any symbols or Nazi-like nicknames. This crime would be punishable by half a year of prison and a 100,000NIS fine.

The law was proposed by MK Shimon Ohayoun (Likud Beyteynu), and it passed yesterday in the committee and will now be prepared for reading in the Knesset.

Ohayoun says about the proposal that there has been an increase in Neo-Nazi activity using Nazi symbols all around the world, and this presents a great danger to Jews everywhere, but as long as it is not illegal in Israel, it is difficult for Israel to complain to foreign entities about these issues.

no more protests like this
The law would make it illegal to use the word nazi or any other name that was used for Nazism or for the forces in the Third Reich. It would be illegal to use the terms and symbols both verbally and in writing. It would be illegal to use them against a person, a group of people or against organizations and corporations. It would also be illegal to use the imagery of the striped uniforms of the prisoners in the concentration camps, the yellow stars, along with the swastika or any other symbol connected to Nazism.

Ohayoun explained that the terms have been creeping in to daily use and it is unacceptable. It is degrading to the sensitivities of the survivors and their descendants.
(source: Ynet)

The protesters at such hafganot are going to have to find a way to change their style completely... At least, if the law will pass, we won't have to suffer the images and chilul hashem of hafganot against the government using Nazi imagery, as has happened a number of times, which is even worse than the "random" calling "Nazi" at a policeman..



------------------------------------------------------
Reach thousands of readers with your ad by advertising on Life in Israel
------------------------------------------------------

8 comments:

  1. Anyone who thinks that we EVER had free speech in Israel is gravely mistaken.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Anyone who thinks that the Torah and Halacha EVER allow free speech is gravely mistaken.

    ReplyDelete
  3. LH, Of course, you are absolutely correct,...as is the Torah.

    I was addressing the deMOCKracy of Israel, whose gov't has Torah observance pretty the farthest down on its list of priorities.

    ReplyDelete
  4. "Free speech" does not mean that you can shout "Fire!" in a crowded theater.
    Nor that you can use hate speech.

    ReplyDelete
  5. RBS resident, Thank you for citing the Supreme Court of a foreign entity.

    "Hate" is a subjective term. Am allowed to call Hitler a Nazi? How? It seems that this law says no. IOW, no to the expression of a fact.

    Furthermore, can't you all see that this is just the beginning (Actually it's way after the beginning).

    Already, it is still against the law to call a gov't official a name. Remember Nadia Matar's case? (Allowed in the U. S., since you brought it up.)

    Incitement to racism is also illegal. (Also allowed in the U. S., since you brought it up.)

    Soon saying HaShem Yaqom damo will be illegal, then next on the docket will be Yemach shemo.

    Soon after that, verses from the Torah.

    Anyone ever peeked inside an Eidoth HaMizrach Yom Kippur Mahzor? Many would call it racist.

    Doesn't anyone see the pattern here?

    ReplyDelete
  6. If you or any of your families "encountered" the lovely Israeli Police in Me'ah Shearim or in the Shomron, I guarantee you that various adjectives and descriptive nouns which would not normally cross your mind, might just cross your mind.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Great blog!
    Another great blog with Jewish content is www.fashionandtorah.com

    ReplyDelete
  8. One of the cornerstones of any democratic state is freedom of speech/press,etc. We do not have that in Israel and this proposed law is just one more nail in the coffin. Israel is a socialist state with a democratic veneer. To those who say there is no free speech in Torah,etc is true...but for now(thank G-d) we are not a theoracy. I say that because there are religious MK's who are just as corrupt as the non religious ones. But I digress...since the term Nazi will be forbidden...does that mean history books, films, etc are forbidden as well? Why Nazi? How come Fascist is OK or instead of Gestapo use KGB. Totalitarian is OK as well. We should start using Newspeak as Orwell envisioned. I suspect that this law if passed will be challenged in the courts and on the streets. If, for example Haridim use in mass, will the police arrest them and then court dockets will be clogged. Lastly, as odious as using the term "Nazi' is...should not be outlawed. It is a violation of a free people and as politicians and others are wont to do...they will add to the list of words one cannot used.

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...