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Jan 30, 2012

Realistic Solution To Solving "The Haredi Problem" (video)

Realistic Solution To Solving "The Haredi Problem"



I should add that Naftali Benet is not the first person to come up with this idea, of exempting haredim completely from military duty and allowing them to enter the workforce unrestricted. Yossi Beilin has suggested this many times, among others. It has so far been rejected because the public does not want to agree to have compulsory draft for every 18 year old while letting the haredim get off and join the workforce without going though the same obligations.

9 comments:

  1. The real solution is to have every single person in this country do either military service OR national service; including Chareidim, full time yeshiva students, women, and Arabs.

    The service can be structured in such a way that, if necessary, people can do service in their own, or nearby communities, and live at home.

    "Full Time" yeshiva students actually get about 3 months of vacation per year. The non-Chag part of that time can be dedicated to local service, which could be 1-2 months per year. If they don't fulfill their requirement while in Yeshiva they can then complete it upon leaving.

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  2. The rabbis never wanted this solution either,even if it would have been publicly acceptable.

    The arrangement (not law) between the army and the Vaad hayeshivot that was put in place at the beginning of the state where Yeshiva students got a deferment as long as they did not work has always been the first choice of the rabbis.
    Any solution that allows the charedim to "go out" in the outside world without the fear of being drafted is frowned upon by the rabbis.
    This is why the Tal Law is only accepted by the charedim bedieved if at all because it allows just that.
    If at the beginning of the state the charedim had been exempted from the army I am not sure that the yeshiva world would have evolved to what it is today.

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  3. thats very true, bohr and it is why i have become very confused over the latesdt argument over the TAL law. while the haredim originally opposed it, and then after it was passed have not really utilized it much, now that it is being considered for revocation the haredi parties are getting upset and want it extended and are willing to make a coalition crisis over the issue. it makes no sense to me.

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  4. Rafi
    The alternatives to the Tal Law are worse in the current climate. Whether it is compulsory draft or national service it would make charedim leave the yeshiva. At least the Tal law allows you to leave the yeshiva/collel system only when you reach a certain age. It is the lesser evil.
    OTOH if we look at what is happening in the army regarding chardal soldiers, there is a basis for the charedims fears.

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  5. It seems to me that many of the problems are caused by these laws which target groups of people instead of just targeting activities.

    I never understood why Yeshiva learners get a certain amount of money which is different from people who wish to do research in university. Or why does military service connect to jobs for Charedim but not to others?

    It's bout time to start making the laws and exemptions more universal.

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  6. It seems to me that in this sort of situation, Israeli law should be written more like halacha.

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  7. One major difference between kollel study and university reseaerch is that univeristy research is not an occupation engaged in by the larger part of an entire community, the way kollel study is. If kollel study were competitive, and only open to a select few chosen by merit, I think the opposition to kollel stipends would virtually disappear.

    As to the army - how about this - let anyone that wants exempt themself from the draft. All they have to do is give up their right to vote. That way, the voters can be that part of the public willing to put its life on the line to carry out the decisions of the elected government. Those entitled to another deferment, such as for health reasons, would not have to give up their right to vote, but it can be an option for those who wish to opt out of their national service.

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  8. "One major difference between kollel study and university reseaerch is that univeristy research is not an occupation engaged in by the larger part of an entire community, the way kollel study is. If kollel study were competitive, and only open to a select few chosen by merit, I think the opposition to kollel stipends would virtually disappear."

    Baruch, I'm not sure what your comment here is trying to say. Currently, the Israeli government does not give stipends to students in University.

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  9. Hi anonymous. My bad, I didn't read your comment carefully enough. In my mind, I was responding to the argument I have heard fairly often that it's unfair to criticize government support of kollels when the government also supports university research that is often connected with obscure topics. But you were saying something completely different, perhaps opposite. Different post, different issue, my bad.

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